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About Photography / Hobbyist Core Member Grant HillebrandMale/South Africa Groups :iconthe-photo-critics: The-Photo-Critics
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The Dark Ages by Boran-Tatli

This is a fascinating treatment of a classical subject, and brings a lot to the table. The way you have managed the tones here - the ul...

Windows in the Dark by AlgeriArts

I tend to agree with ohmkizawa here, but have a few of my own thoughts too, so... I'm always a sucker for these kinds of high-contrast ...

Whatever The Weather In Full Sun by FireFlyExposed

All sorts of interesting ideas here - the words, the old style books in the garden, in the sun ... The fundamental composition works we...

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A really delicate, elegant, gentle still life. Its simplicity draws one back, and yes, it does speak peace and quiet. The two foundatio...

Some for The-Photo-Critics, but some others as well. You can find 'comment crits' here
The stars are really a bit(?) biased - I tend to have critted images I like!
Feel free to request a crit - as I have time, I'll get there.


There are a number of good macro tutorials already out there (here, here, and here, amongst others) so this is aimed at someone who has maybe taken a few pictures already, and is looking now to try something a little different. There are many variations and alternative approaches, but this might help you get going, and try something a little different.

Some folks get strung up about macro vs close-up. There is a difference, but in reality, if it looks good, it's great. For this, I'm going to bundle macro (bigger than life-size onto the sensor) and 'closeup' into one term. Much easier.

Also, please click through to the full size images of the thumbs featured here - they are fine pieces of work often deserving of more recognition than they have. I have only used my own images as a last resort, when I could not find a specific idea (or wanted to show how not to do it!)

Cape Goosberry by Switchblade77
Just because its a pretty close-up!


You will most likely need something more than a cell-phone for closeup work. A cellphone/ iPad can get quite close, and with a little cropping, is certainly playing in the closeup world but you may well get frustrated quite soon.

Untitled by Siljesteen33
Taken with an iPhone 5s - not at all frustrating!

Many bridge cameras have macro modes, or have lenses that focus in really close, and these certainly can make a go of it. To get really close though, most of the equipment out there is made for an SLR, so that's where this is likely to end. That said, if you're starting out, the bottom end Canon 1200D DSLR is cheaper than many bridge cameras and any lenses you buy for it will still work when you lash out on that 5D!

Glass by wojtar
Taken with a Canon PowerShot A640

Glass ...

Most of macro is in the lens - getting that great big closeup image onto the sensor. There are various options, ranging from free to cheap to sell-your-car expensive.

Reversing the lens

If you have a removable lens camera, taking the lens off, reversing it, and holding it against the body is a quick and cheap way to focus really close. Here  is a quick guide to the reversing-the-lens technique. Just watch the dirt on the sensor and back of the lens, particularly if you get really close, or start spraying water around with a spritzer bottle.


  You can fix a magnifying glass to the front of you camera with sticky tape. You can get screw on 'filters' - diopters - which do the same thing with better quality glass, and lens alignment, and doesn't leave a sticky residue on the focussing ring! Here's an eBay search - just add in the filter diameter of your lens
If you have a fixed lens smartphone camera, you can get add-on lenses for these. However I would recommend being careful - you can spend the price of a nice second-hand camera on some of those lenses, and get poorer results than a 'real' camera will give.

Extending the lens

Essentially, macro is about really close focus, so anything that moves the lens out from the body will also work - cardboard tubes can do the job in a pinch, but extension tubes are a better bet (Amazon has them for less than U$20).
Bellows are my favourite though:
a200 + Bellows by AfricanObserver
One caveat here is that extending the lens chews light, and you will need lots of it - or high ISO or long exposure - if you go this route!

Macro Lenses

These can head off into serious money, but also deliver a lot of convenience - autofocus, portability and flexibility - great if you want to work out in the field or with things that move a bit. These are certainly popular with the macro photographers here on dA. If you have that much money to spend, enjoy the research!

If you have a (D)SLR, don't overlook older equipment from analogue days - there are some great M42 (and other mount) lenses that can do awesome work! A lot of macro work is quite 'manual', so this kit is quite up to the job. My bellows were bought for a Minolta SRT 101b about 35 years ago, and, with the addition of a US$10 adapter, they still work!


Macro can take time to set up, and small movements can mangle focus and composition, to say nothing of blurring the image. Some of the exposure times also stretch out, so a tripod of some sort - a gorrillapod, or an old dusty one from the garage, or resting the camera on a cushion - can make  the difference between "a nice idea, but not quite" and "nailed".
If you've got U$25 or so to spare, a  fine grain slider can be very helpful - you really are looking at movements in the millimetres with macro.


Lighting an object that may be 10mm from your lens can be challenging! I'm a fan of natural and flood lighting, and desk lamps, LED's on stalks (the kind you use for reading), torches and windows can do a great job.

A lot of folks like flashes - they are bright, and they deal with the shake inherent in the magnification of macro. They also open the option of high-speed macro - drop splashes, and the like.
Black and Blue by endprocess83
If you use a flash, a small light box made from tissue paper can make your flash quite usable. This is a quick and cheap way to use your on-camera flash for macro work!

Macro has a lot in common with still life studio work, and many of the lighting techniques -light boxes, 3 point lighting, catch-lights for highlights, side-lighting for texture - all work in the small really well:
 Quality Time by ZenAkita

If you think it needs a fancy studio to do macro, this setup resulted in a DD, featured below.
           Day 3 behind the scenes by Z-Nous

Because everything is so small, a cellphone or tablet with a coloured image on full brightness can serve as a great fill light too!


It is easy to get caught up in all the technicalities of getting in close to a subject and then not paying attention to the composition. There are really lots of composition tutorials out there, but this one is a great start!

A couple of other points:
  • When you get in close, your Depth of Field (DoF) becomes very shallow - a couple of millimetres quite often, even when stopped down to f16. This means that perspective has to be created differently, or the lack of perspective used creatively. It also makes focusing a challenge - the electronic viewfinder cameras are a boon here!
  • One can lose track of the background all too easily, thinking that the shallow DoF will make for beautiful bokeh. If it doesn't, a sheet of paper curved up in mini-studio style, under and then behind the subject can work wonders.
  • If you succumb (as you will, at least once!) to droplet photography, remember that they work like lenses, and you will see straight through them. This can be very effective, or very off-putting, depending on how you manage your composition.
y by MarcosRodriguez

Ideas - what to shoot

So, with some appropriate kit and a refresher on composition, the question is what to point the camera at?
Running through the macro folder here on dA, there seem to be some favourite and common themes. (There are also a pile of miscategorisations, of non-macro images, and even some non-photographic work so do be careful when submitting, please!)


forest lantern by strcplp3


Fear by ElyneNoir

And bugs

Sleep Walking III by dalantech

Personally, I like objects. Some of my favourites:

Attached III by moondrummy   Confluence I by AlejandroCastillo
 . Tangled . by KimberleePhotography  Day 3 by Z-Nous

So what do they have in common? There is only one DD here, and some with very few views indeed, so that's not it!
A couple of things for me, apart from being in nice and close:
  1. Crisp contrast. Looking through the folder for shots to illustrate these ideas, I went past a few that were a little soft when you got close in. One has to take the time to get the focus and exposure 'right'.
  2. Often, something shiny, which, it may be argued is what leads to the contrast, but is not quite the same thing.
  3. Evocative texture. Maybe it's just me, but I can feel these things.
So hunting down contrasty, shiny textures may be a place to start.

Like a frozen bubble!
Marble effect by gigi50

As gigi50 says "I did spend a few hours on my back deck doing these". Macro is not really a drive-by shooting style, although you might get lucky occasionally. It is worth the time and effort to set things up carefully, and be willing to try, see what works, and try again, slightly differently. A small change to lighting - either from the passing of time, or moving a light, can make the difference between "nice" and "WOW". A small change in camera angle can pick up a highlight, or clean up the background. Moving focus by a tiny amount can highlight a fascinating texture.

I prefer to run exposure manually, picking the spot that I want to be "averagely" exposed, and then working around that. With high contrast subject, the camera can try to average over everything, and blow out highlights, or clog up shadows. If in doubt, bracket your shots, preferably with shutter speed, since f-stop is trying hard to get decent depth of field, and ISO should be just below where noise gets noticeable, to allow for the closed down f-stop. The extra second or two in bracketing is often rewarded in post-processing, when you have something really nice to work with.


This is not photojournalism, so one has a little more latitude in what you can do to the image. It seems that many people don't spend time "developing" their images, which is sad, because often, half and hour with Photoshop, or in my case, the free GIMP, can make all the difference to an image.

Apart from cropping, which the excellent composition tutorials handle, here are some other options to consider. In my workflow, I usually use them in this order, but often crop near the end
  • Flip the image. The difference in the path the eye takes through the image can be huge with a Left-right flip. And of course, the flip doesn't have to be left right!
Blue Tree by BokehLight
  • Use an unsharp mask, which, despite its name, gives an image a nice snappy crispness, or sharpness.

Here is a before 2012-12-27 15-22-28 - Original by AfricanObserver and after  Threaded by AfricanObserver

Below is GIMP's unsharp mask. The "radius" is the size of "lens" it will apply to looking for edges to sharpen. In my experience, a smaller value is generally better, along with a smaller "amount". Large values tend give those odd halos around images (it does also depend on the image!). Rather use the filter twice, than get halos. Layering the image, and then erasing those sections you don't want sharpened also works.

Unsharp Mask by AfricanObserver

  • Adjust the contrast via the curves. The curves tool allow fine control of exactly where the contrast is increased. It takes a little time to master, but the degree of control it gives is really worth the effort:

Untitled Drawing by AfricanObserver

If you want to watermark your work, do it here, rather than using the dA one, which is quite intrusive.

And a last thought. Since the camera is setup on a stable tripod, and if you are running continuous light, try pushing the "video" button on your camera. Drops splashing, insects stepping, flowers blowing in the breeze, clocks ticking - it opens up a whole new world.

Good luck, and please share your comments, tips, tricks and ideas in the comments!

I have 45 images from the Unite Against Corruption march yesterday, currently on facebook:

2 deviants said Just pick 2 or 3 - if I want the whole story, I can follow the fb link
1 deviant said Post them here too - I'll wade through 45 entries in your inbox
No deviants said That's what Facebook is for - don't post them here
No deviants said Put them on this other site that is made for the photoessay - I'll tell you in the comments


AfricanObserver's Profile Picture
Grant Hillebrand
Artist | Hobbyist | Photography
South Africa
teacher, geek, Christ follower
attention span of a grasshopper

Drinker of copious quantities of tea.



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JustACapharnaum Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2015

Welcome to the group :iconmacropoetry:!

Please take the time to read
the rules of the group before submitting your work to our group
Also, we're holding
a contest with great prizes to win!

We hope you enjoy your stay with us :)

Have a nice day

AfricanObserver Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Looks like fun!
JustACapharnaum Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2015
It does! :eager:
Markotxe Featured By Owner Nov 11, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
hey, thks for your Watch
AfricanObserver Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Love your style.
Markotxe Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
merci !
WayneBenedet Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2015
Thank you for the :+fav: Grant
AfricanObserver Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
My pleasure.
RadoslawSass Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2015   Photographer
Tobogan by RadoslawSass

Thank You for fav : )
AfricanObserver Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2015  Hobbyist Photographer
Totally worth it!
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